Star Bright Business

Archive for the ‘Products’ Category

While Amazon’s regular emails with product suggestions do not fully qualify as newsletters, they give us yet another example of a simple way to remind customers of your product.

Amazon sends out regular emails to me, featuring products I might be interested in based on my previous purchases. The emails start with a summary of products and their photos and then gives more product details. They get me interested in a product before they give me the details. The summary also serves as a useful way of telling me what I’m in for. All newsletters should make their point clear from the very first sentence to the subject headline.

A quick word of caution based on Amazon‘s emails, however. While the emails are sometimes helpful, they come far too often and are often repetitious, which easily gets on my nerves. Always be careful to avoid annoying your customers with too many emails. It’s usually more useful to pick a regular date on which to send your newsletter and at a rate that will not annoy customers.

What do you add to your newsletters to remind customer’s of your products?

Read Newsletters Part 1

Read Newsletters Part 2

Two interesting opposing viewpoint posts over at HubSpot echo some thoughts and questions I’ve had for a while: Are public relations and marketing two completely different things? Or, do they contribute to one another? Or, are they becoming the same thing?

While many of my teachers and several of those I follow on the web seem to believe marketing and public relations are two separate things, I’ve come to think of them as integrated with the possibility of becoming one thing under the right circumstances, especially when it comes to social media.

Social media networks like Facebook and Twitter can be used to inform, to interact with publics, and to remind publics of a company’s product. For example, at Sierra Repertory Theatre, one marketing person heads the social media efforts, posting links to interesting articles and interacting with customers about theatre, but also linking to ticketing systems, commenting on the success of shows, and reminding customers that they only have a few days left to see shows.

I worked for Sierra Repertory Theatre a little over the summer and found that the theatre company has a one-person marketing department that handles both marketing and public relations. The position basically involved maintaining positive relationships with theatre goers and with theatre reviewers at various area newspapers, but it also involves dealing with subscribers and maintaining subscriptions and donations.

In this case, it would seem that marketing and public relations overlap.

What do you think? Can public relations and marketing work together or become one? Are sales driven by public relations?

Have you ever noticed that when a movie becomes successful, a line of books come shortly after.  Disney did this with Pirates of the Caribbean.  They created a series of young adult books about Jack Sparrow.  I remember reading book versions of The Mummy Returns and Hallmark’s Arabian Nights.  And today I came across a new series of books based on the hit TV show Glee.  You can visit the site for the book, which FOX advertised on Facebook, here.

How successful are these knock-off books?  What have you done similar to this?

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