Star Bright Business

Archive for the ‘Customer Service’ Category

Making your company’s blog or newsletter effective drives traffic to your website and gains the confidence of your customers. Drew Zagorski has some great advice on making your newsletter successful. On his “Left Brain Right Brain” blog, he writes newsletters should:

  • Position you as a thought leader
  • Remain in front of your audience
  • Drive traffic to your website
  • Enhance your relevance in search engines
  • Increase your presence in the social network space
  • Promote not only your business but the business of the people who you do business with
  • Present sales offers to drive sales

Zagorski goes into more detail on his blog.

In your mind, what makes a successful newsletter? How do you drive traffic to your site?

Read Newsletters Part 1: Know the audience you’re writing to

Read Newsletters Part 2: Use simplicity to sell your product

Read Newsletters Part 3: Amazon’s product suggestions


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While Amazon’s regular emails with product suggestions do not fully qualify as newsletters, they give us yet another example of a simple way to remind customers of your product.

Amazon sends out regular emails to me, featuring products I might be interested in based on my previous purchases. The emails start with a summary of products and their photos and then gives more product details. They get me interested in a product before they give me the details. The summary also serves as a useful way of telling me what I’m in for. All newsletters should make their point clear from the very first sentence to the subject headline.

A quick word of caution based on Amazon‘s emails, however. While the emails are sometimes helpful, they come far too often and are often repetitious, which easily gets on my nerves. Always be careful to avoid annoying your customers with too many emails. It’s usually more useful to pick a regular date on which to send your newsletter and at a rate that will not annoy customers.

What do you add to your newsletters to remind customer’s of your products?

Read Newsletters Part 1

Read Newsletters Part 2

Newsletters can be a useful method for keeping your customers interested in what  you have to offer. They give customers a gentle nudge and a friendly reminder of your existence.

Whether you use a physical newsletter or an e-newsletter depends on your audience. An older audience might prefer a physical paper, while a younger, tech-savvy audience may prefer an e-newsletter delivered straight to their email.

Last summer, I worked for a theatre company (Sierra Repertory Theatre) that used both methods. They created a physical paper a few times a year that they sent to season subscribers and put on display for audience members to read while they waited for shows to start. SRT also sends out an e-newsletter through PatronMail twice a month. The newsletter provides a quick introductory news blurb written as a personal note from the marketing director. It then goes on to provide articles about people involved in current productions. Theatre goers like to learn about what goes on behind the scenes, and the local audience that SRT serves is an old-fashioned one that prefers reading about people over reading about news. SRT’s newsletter caters to its audience. It also provides sidebars that remind readers of current production dates and of needs for volunteer ushers.

What do you do to make your newsletter successful?

According to a blog post by Jayblock Companies, the god Proteus was known for two things:

  1. “He was able to foretell / predict the future and…
  2. He was able to change, adapt, and acclimate himself to successfully meet and thrive in the future that he envisioned.”

While the blog post focused on the application of this to the job market, I find that this has equal application to public relations and marketing. Far too many companies are reluctant to change with the times. Newspapers have gone under because of their leadership’s unwillingness to adapt and use modern technology. Read the rest of this entry »

It’s the holiday season, which puts customers in a cheery mood. People always love to see and hear feel good stories like those of Extreme Home Makeover, but they love these stories of charity, hope and love even more during the Thanksgiving and Christmas seasons. And the holiday decorations give you the chance to make your little bit of charity even more unique.

For example, Disney has given one family a special treat and posted photos of it on their blog. The blog reads:

…this year we teamed up with Sylvania andCHOC Children’s to take the magic of the holiday season from the Resort to the home of one special little girl and her family. Adela Jauregui, 8, a patient at CHOC Children’s, and her family watched as their home lit up with more than 6,200 lights and Disney-themed décor.

What a great way to bless others and bring attention to yourself at the same time. The real challenge is to find a way to do this all year in unique ways that please and bring in customers.

How have you used special causes to promote your company?

Many news outlets have made themselves more successful by pursuing and allowing citizen journalism. It seems Disney Resorts has had a similar idea. The company has created a Facebook page design specially for Disney fans to share their Disney parks memories in the form of text, photos and videos.

Called “Disney Memories,” the application gives the average everyday person the opportunity to feel in charge, to feel special, to feel, as Mickey Mouse would put it, like they’re in the “happiest place on earth.” Read the rest of this entry »

When you live in SoCal, have a Disneyland season pass, and go to Disneyland as often as I do, you begin to notice things. You might have just read that book about all the hidden Mickeys, or you might just be an observant person. Either way, you notice things. For example, you might notice that Disney does not sell gum at its parks.

I’d imagine Disney’s customers would not be too happy if Disney made a no bubble gum rule, a rule that would likely be impossible to enforce.  So, instead of making its customers irritated, Disneyland Resort turned it around into an implied rule instead of a stated rule.  Disney does not sell gum in its parks, but it doesn’t make it illegal either.  This keeps customers happy.  It keeps the park clean, but allows customers, hopefully the more responsible customers, to bring their own gum.

How do you keep your customers happy?  What do you do to sweeten the seemingly negative things?

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